Difference between revisions of "Patent pumpkin tubes"

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(Created page with "Unspecified fictional instrument used in the bombastic symphony (opus 8421) by fictional composer/conductor Horridnoise, in the far flung future of 1995, from the satirica...")
 
 
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Unspecified fictional instrument used in the bombastic symphony (opus 8421) by fictional composer/conductor [[Horridnoise]], in the far flung future of 1995, from the satirical review "The Symphony in 1995," by K. King, published in 1885, in music magazine ''The Etude'', November 1885 (Volume 03, Number 11).
 
Unspecified fictional instrument used in the bombastic symphony (opus 8421) by fictional composer/conductor [[Horridnoise]], in the far flung future of 1995, from the satirical review "The Symphony in 1995," by K. King, published in 1885, in music magazine ''The Etude'', November 1885 (Volume 03, Number 11).
  
It seems to be some variant on a [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pipe_organ pipe organ].
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It seems to be some variant on a [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pipe_organ pipe organ]. It must be a recent invention, since it's still under patent.
  
 
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Latest revision as of 07:00, 27 September 2019

Unspecified fictional instrument used in the bombastic symphony (opus 8421) by fictional composer/conductor Horridnoise, in the far flung future of 1995, from the satirical review "The Symphony in 1995," by K. King, published in 1885, in music magazine The Etude, November 1885 (Volume 03, Number 11).

It seems to be some variant on a pipe organ. It must be a recent invention, since it's still under patent.

From the fiftieth to the fifty-sixth movement occurs the great diminuendo passage of the composition, the idea being to portray the gradual sinking from sight of all that is objectionable. There are to be found some very fine fugue passages for the patent pumpkin tubes, and the termination of this leads us to the fifty-sixth, with the duo for two immense flutes — each played by twenty-four men.

See also

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