Difference between revisions of "Versificator"

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A machine that writes and creates music designed to appeal to the lowest common denominator (the Proles) in George Orwell's 1949 classic ''Nineteen Eighty-Four''. A song written by a versificator ("It was only a hopeless fancy") recurs throughout the second section of the novel.
 
A machine that writes and creates music designed to appeal to the lowest common denominator (the Proles) in George Orwell's 1949 classic ''Nineteen Eighty-Four''. A song written by a versificator ("It was only a hopeless fancy") recurs throughout the second section of the novel.
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<blockquote>
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''It was only an 'opeless fancy,''<br \>
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''It passed like an Ipril dye,''<br \>
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''But a look an' a word an' the dreams they stirred''<br \>
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''They 'ave stolen my 'eart awye!''
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The tune had been haunting London for weeks past. It was one of countless similar songs published for the benefit of the proles by a sub-section of the Music Department. The words of these songs were composed without any human intervention whatever on an instrument known as a versificator.
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</blockquote>
 
[[Category:1949]]
 
[[Category:1949]]
 
[[Category:Novels]]
 
[[Category:Novels]]
 
[[Category:Fictional instruments]]
 
[[Category:Fictional instruments]]

Latest revision as of 07:33, 4 April 2019

A machine that writes and creates music designed to appeal to the lowest common denominator (the Proles) in George Orwell's 1949 classic Nineteen Eighty-Four. A song written by a versificator ("It was only a hopeless fancy") recurs throughout the second section of the novel.

It was only an 'opeless fancy,
It passed like an Ipril dye,
But a look an' a word an' the dreams they stirred
They 'ave stolen my 'eart awye!

The tune had been haunting London for weeks past. It was one of countless similar songs published for the benefit of the proles by a sub-section of the Music Department. The words of these songs were composed without any human intervention whatever on an instrument known as a versificator.