Difference between revisions of "Zeb McCracken"

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(Created page with "rightSouthern guitar-playing foot soldier of Baker Company in "The Phantom Company" story of Korean War comic ''G.I. Joe'' #20 (April 1953)...")
 
 
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[[Image:McCracken_Zeb_G_I_Joe.png|right]]Southern guitar-playing foot soldier of Baker Company in "The Phantom Company" story of Korean War comic ''G.I. Joe'' #20 (April 1953). He keeps the troops' morale up, and has even composed a ballad (also called "The Phantom Company") that gives his commander an idea that lets sneak up on the enemy soldiers that have them trapped in a cave. Zeb is wounded in the ensuing firefight, but the story makes the Army's ''Stars and Stripes'' newspaper, and his song becomes popular with the troops.  
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[[Image:McCracken_Zeb_G_I_Joe.png|right]]Southern guitar-playing foot soldier of Baker Company in "The Phantom Company" story of Korean War comic ''G.I. Joe'' #20 (April 1953). He keeps the troops' morale up, and has even composed a ballad (also called "The Phantom Company") that gives his commander an idea to sneak up on the enemy soldiers that have them trapped in a cave. Zeb is wounded in the ensuing firefight, but the story makes the Army's ''Stars and Stripes'' newspaper, and his song becomes popular with the troops.  
  
 
A coda to the story reveals the ballad was based on a true story of his ancestor, Revolutionary War Captain Davy McCracken.
 
A coda to the story reveals the ballad was based on a true story of his ancestor, Revolutionary War Captain Davy McCracken.

Latest revision as of 20:01, 8 December 2018

McCracken Zeb G I Joe.png
Southern guitar-playing foot soldier of Baker Company in "The Phantom Company" story of Korean War comic G.I. Joe #20 (April 1953). He keeps the troops' morale up, and has even composed a ballad (also called "The Phantom Company") that gives his commander an idea to sneak up on the enemy soldiers that have them trapped in a cave. Zeb is wounded in the ensuing firefight, but the story makes the Army's Stars and Stripes newspaper, and his song becomes popular with the troops.

A coda to the story reveals the ballad was based on a true story of his ancestor, Revolutionary War Captain Davy McCracken.

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