Difference between revisions of "Kevorkian Twins"

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(Created page with "Band with at least three albums mentioned in passing in the 2011 science fiction novel ''[https://books.google.com/books?id=3aJ0CwAAQBAJ&lpg=PT85&pg=PP1#v=onepage&q&f=false Fa...")
 
 
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Everyone looked at her for a moment in silence.  
 
Everyone looked at her for a moment in silence.  
  
“Well, if you don't have it, got any Kevorkian Twins ... third album?” “Beethoven,” suggested Mary. “Ode to Joy, perhaps.  
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“Well, if you don't have it, got any '''Kevorkian Twins''' ... third album?”  
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“Beethoven,” suggested Mary. “Ode to Joy, perhaps."
 
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The band's name is a reference to controversial right-to-die advocate [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Kevorkian Dr. Jack Kevorkian] (1928–2011). Kevorkian inspired the name of a real band, Jack Kevorkian and the Suicide Machines, which was later shortened to just [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Suicide_Machines The Suicide Machines].
  
  

Latest revision as of 09:48, 23 September 2019

Band with at least three albums mentioned in passing in the 2011 science fiction novel Farthest Reef by Karl Kofoed.

Alex sighed. "Anyone for music?" he asked. “Or is the clicker men's chorus everyone's cuppajoe?”

"Hawkwind," said Tony.

“Blues Magoos,” requested Tsu.

Everyone looked at her for a moment in silence.

“Well, if you don't have it, got any Kevorkian Twins ... third album?”

“Beethoven,” suggested Mary. “Ode to Joy, perhaps."

The band's name is a reference to controversial right-to-die advocate Dr. Jack Kevorkian (1928–2011). Kevorkian inspired the name of a real band, Jack Kevorkian and the Suicide Machines, which was later shortened to just The Suicide Machines.


See also

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